EdgarJRG holistic place, where i post and reblog without thematic. Check out my secondary blogs.
Reblogged from hqlines  230 notes

For one human being to love another human being: that is perhaps the most difficult task that has been given to us, the ultimate, the final problem and proof, the work for which all other work is merely preparation. By Rainer Maria Rilke, The Selected Poetry (via hqlines)

Reblogged from jerrylieveld  11 notes

How to create great UX documents

jerrylieveld:

Like it or not the UX profession is very much in the documents game. From personas to wireframes and from user journeys to sitemaps, UX is knee deep in documentation. bit.ly/1trJYj9

Curated by User Experience - UX - Mobile - Design - Jerry Lieveld

Reblogged from emergentfutures  71 notes
smartercities:

IBM Teams With Swiss Startup For Solar ‘Sunflower’ | Forbes
When someone mentions solar technology, invariably we think of rows upon rows of rectangular panels. A system being developed by Switzerland’s Airlight Energy together with IBM IBM +0.1% Research rethinks the traditional shape, with intriguing environmental and efficiency implications.
Officially dubbed the High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (aka HCPVT) system, the technology is designed look like a 32-foot-high sunflower. The dish measures roughly 430 square feet, covered with 36 elliptic mirrors that concentrate sunlight into liquid-cooled receivers containing an array of PV chips. (It’s the same sort of cooling technology used in IBM supercomputers.) There’s an advanced tracking system that turns the dish throughout the day to optimize sunlight capture.

smartercities:

IBM Teams With Swiss Startup For Solar ‘Sunflower’ | Forbes

When someone mentions solar technology, invariably we think of rows upon rows of rectangular panels. A system being developed by Switzerland’s Airlight Energy together with IBM IBM +0.1% Research rethinks the traditional shape, with intriguing environmental and efficiency implications.

Officially dubbed the High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (aka HCPVT) system, the technology is designed look like a 32-foot-high sunflower. The dish measures roughly 430 square feet, covered with 36 elliptic mirrors that concentrate sunlight into liquid-cooled receivers containing an array of PV chips. (It’s the same sort of cooling technology used in IBM supercomputers.) There’s an advanced tracking system that turns the dish throughout the day to optimize sunlight capture.